HSA contributions and limits

Because an HSA is a bank account, anyone can contribute to it, including you, your employees and your employees’ family or friends. No matter who puts money in, there’s a limit to what can be contributed each year.

High-deductible health plan limits

To have an HSA, you have to have a high-deductible health plan (HDHP). HDHPs set limits for how much members pay for health care services before the health insurance starts paying, and their maximum out-of-pocket amount.

2022 2023 Change
HSA contribution limit
(employer + employee)

Individual: $3,650

Family: $7,300

Individual: $3,850

Family: $7,750

Individual: +$200

Family: +$450

HDHP minimum deductibles

Individual: $1,400

Family: $2,800 but not less than $2,800 per person

Individual: $1,500

Family: $3,000 but not less than $3,000 per person

Individual: +100

Family: +200

HDHP maximum out-of-pocket amounts
(deductibles, copayments and other amounts, but not premiums)

Individual: $7,050

Family: $14,100 but no more than $8,700 a person

Individual: $7,500

Family: $15,000 but no more than $9,100 per person

Individual: +$450

Family: +$900

HHS annual out-of-pocket limit

Individual: $8,700

Family: $17,400 but no more than $8,700 per person

Individual: $9,100

Family: $18,200 but no more than $9,100 per person

Individual: +$400

Family: +$800

HSA catch-up contributions
(age 55 or older)1
$1,000  $1,000 No change2

1Catch-up contributions can be made any time during the year in which the HSA participant turns 55.
2Unlike other limits, the HSA catch-up contribution amount is not indexed; any increase would require legislative change.